The Courses

A tale of two courses

Set within the opulent surroundings of the Brocket Hall Estate, our two championship standard golf courses sit beautifully in the 18th Century parkland. The courses are appropriately named after the Prime Ministers who once resided at Brocket Hall, Lord Palmerston and Lord Melbourne. Both are quintessentially British in design, but at the same time offer a completely different challenge for golfers of all abilities. They are exceptionally maintained allowing them to remain open all year round, with no winter greens even on the coldest of days.

Together, they are two of the finest golf courses in England and provide the perfect backdrop for the tournaments and golf days that fill the social calendar. Both courses regularly play host to professional and members’ tournaments as well as Pro-Am tournaments where our members can meet and play with professionals from around the world.

The Melbourne Course

ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL COURSES IN ENGLAND

The par 72 Melbourne Course was opened in June 1992 and is the handiwork of design duo and former Ryder Cup golfers Peter Alliss and Clive Clark. Both Alliss and Clark have spent many years excelling in various areas of the golf industry, and their encyclopaedic knowledge of the game shines through as soon as you set foot on the course.

The course provides an enjoyable challenge in stunning surroundings, crossing the River Lea on four occasions as you follow the natural contours of the Estate, before a memorable finish in front of the Hall after a short ferry ride to the 18th green.

The Capibility Brown inspired parkland can truly be experienced in the Melbourne course, with the sweeping lawns, clumps of well placed trees and meandering river, challenging golfers to think about each and every shot.

The Palmerston Course

A WOODLAND MASTERPIECE

Regarded as something rather special by its famed English architects Donald Steel & Martin Ebert, this course is one of the finest that they created. The Palmerston is frequently held up as a perfect example of a top quality golf course created with minimum intrusion to the site.

In contrast to the Melbourne, on the tree lined Palmerston you don’t have to contend with the river at all, instead the Estate’s ancient woodland of rare Hornbeam, Scots and Corsican Pine and 500 year old Oak trees create some of the most spectacular hazards likely to be encountered on a golf course. Teamed with fiendishly placed bunkers and large undulating greens this challenging par 73 is a great test and is rightfully rated as one of the best courses in England.

Local Rules

1. OUT OF BOUNDS

A ball over any estate boundary or fence is out of bounds. Other out of bounds areas are defined by white posts.

2. FIXED SPRINKLER HEADS AND MANHOLE COVERS

All fixed sprinkler heads & manhole covers are immovable instructions and relief from interference by them may be obtained under rule 16.1. In addition, relief may be taken if a fixed sprinkler head positioned within 2 club lengths of the putting green intervenes on the line of play between the ball and the hole, provided the ball is not in a hazard but lies within 2 club lengths of the fixed sprinkler head; the ball may be marked, lifted, cleaned and dropped at the nearest point of relief which is (a) not nearer the hole (b) avoids such intervention and (c)
is not a hazard or on the putting green

3. PENALTY AREAS

The reservoir to the left of the fairway on the 2nd and 7th hole are Red Penalty areas.

4. ROADS PATHS, YARDAGE DISCS, BRIDGES AND FENCES

Relief may be obtained without penalty under rule 16.1, if a players stance over the ball is hindered by and or the ball is lying on any of the tarmac roads, tarmac paths, public footpaths and the path running to the left and behind the first green, or coloured fairway yardage discs within the course, or the bridge. All other tracks and paths are an integral part of the course.

5. YOUNG TREES

If staked or guarded young trees interfere with a player’s stance or the area of their intended swing, the ball MUST be marked, lifted, cleaned and dropped without penalty within one club length from the relief area under rule 16.1

6. GROUND UNDER REPAIR

In any area marked Ground Under Repair or GUR, a player must not play the ball form or take the stance in such ground; the player MUST take relief under rule 16.1

7. PENALTY FOR BREACH OF LOCAL RULE

Match play loss of hole; stroke play – 2 strokes

ETIQUETTE OF GOLF

All players must replace divots, rake sand bunkers after use and repair pitch marks on greens. Please do not take trolleys or buggies onto greens. Keep your place on the course, walk briskly between shots and be ready to play. Golfers must give priority to walkers before taking their golf shots

For more information or to enquire about available dates please contact;

golfevents@brocket-hall.co.uk | 01707 368700

Did you know?

Martin Ebert graduated from Cambridge University, where he studied engineering. He was soon offered a position to assist Donald Steel in 1990. A member of The R&A, Ebert professes to being inspired by the work of Harry Colt, Alister MacKenzie and Seth Raynor among others.

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Location

Brocket Hall,
Welwyn,
Hertfordshire AL8 7XG

Brocket Hall

Brocket Hall Estate, an exclusive and unique venue for golf, corporate events, weddings and parties, is fully staffed with professional butlers discreetly anticipating your every whim and a team of chefs delivering the highest culinary standards.

quintessentially English Country Estate